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Mooooove Over, Meat

By Krissy Waite

Giving up hamburgers and ice cream in the next 15 years could save us from global climate catastrophe.

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Beware Second Hand Bong Smoke

By Krissy Waite

Most people today recognize the health risks of inhaling tobacco smoke, even secondhand. Fewer are aware of the dangers of cannabis smoke.

Sight Unseen

By Leah Worthington and Illustration by David Junkin

The paradox of blindsight might unlock the mystery of consciousness.

The View from the Trenches

By Glen Martin and Photos by Marcus Hanschen

Two years into the pandemic, SARS-CoV-2 continues to defy predictions. At the date of this writing, the Omicron variant—as contagious as ultra-transmissible viruses such as measles, if somewhat less severe than earlier COVID variants—continues to spread rapidly. While the surge appears to be ebbing in some areas of the United States, hospitalizations remain high and, nationally, about 2,500 deaths are reported daily. 

Peregrines in Love

By Hayden Royster

If Berkeley has a celebrity couple, it’s Annie and Grinnell, the peregrine falcons who alighted on the Campanile and have called it home since late 2016.

D9PEX9 Homeless young Iraq War veteran begging on 34th Street in New York City. There are many war casualties wandering city streets

Unpacking PTSD

By Dhoha Bareche

A study led by researchers from Berkeley and UCSF may help explain why some people are more resilient to traumatic stress than others and lead to possible therapies. Published in December in the journal Translational Psychiatry, the study found a link between increased myelination in the brain’s gray matter and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). 

You Are Probably Burned Out at Work

By Wyatte Grantham-Philips

A Q&A with Dr. Christina Maslach

Post-Pandemic, Teletherapy Is Here to Stay

DR. HANNAH ZEAVIN’S WORK explores the question of how we recover from trauma, and the roles that technology and media play in how we understand each other and ourselves. She is a lecturer in the English and History departments at UC Berkeley and an affiliate of Berkeley’s Center for Science, Technology, Medicine and Society, and […]

Slippery Slopes and Other Concerns About End of Life Options

By Leah Worthington

A Q&A on the ethics of aid-in-dying with Dr. Guy Micco.

Calculating the Emotional Cost of Remote Learning

The past year has been very difficult for the kids. Prolonged school closures, which have lasted over a year for most middle and high schoolers in California, have deprived students of normal social and academic interactions—during one of the most important stages in their social-emotional learning. Adolescent brains are particularly geared toward seeking status and […]

“We Are in A Race”: Surviving the Next Phase of the Pandemic

California periodically touches base on the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic with John Swartzberg, a UC Berkeley Public Health Clinical Professor and a globally respected authority on infectious diseases and vaccinology. In February, Dr. Swartzberg was highly optimistic about the rollout of several effective vaccines and opined that the coronavirus might be largely contained by the summer. Things […]

In the Navajo Nation, Fighting COVID and Years of Neglect

The scene is familiar: A hospital bed, a respirator, medical personnel in full PPE. But while the attending doctor is from San Francisco, California, the hospital is located 1,000 miles away, in the middle of 27,000 miles of vast, desert land. The Navajo Nation, which spans Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico, is self-governed but receives […]