Andrea Roth

Catching the Brain in a Lie: Is “Mind Reading” Deception Detection Sci-Fi—or Science?

Ever since the inception of our species, humans have wanted to peer inside each other’s minds. A major reason we want to do this is because we lie. We lie a lot, and on the whole, we are quite good at it. The capacity for deception is possibly one of the most significant cognitive gifts we received through evolution.

But it turns out that we lack an equal genius for spotting deception. Instead we keep trying to capitalize on technology—hoping it can do the detecting for us. Read more about Catching the Brain in a Lie: Is "Mind Reading" Deception Detection Sci-Fi—or Science? »

Policing the Police: New Demands to Reform the Rules for Secret Grand Juries

The toxic aftereffects of the killing of unarmed 18 year old by a Ferguson, Missouri police officer have not only persisted but, if anything, intensified in the wake of similar disturbing cases. Taken together, they have fueled the perception that cops too often shoot young men of color in haste, and with insufficient cause. Simmering distrust of the police has led to protest, rage, and at the extreme end, violent retaliation: two New York City cops were shot to death sitting in their car. Read more about Policing the Police: New Demands to Reform the Rules for Secret Grand Juries »

Richmond Police Have a New Take on the Oldest Profession—But Is It Legal?

Increasingly, police are looking at the world’s oldest profession as anything but a profession. Rather, they claim, it’s simple human trafficking, the sexual enthrallment of women and girls by heinous pimps for exploitation by amoral customers. Consequently, prostitutes increasingly are considered victims, and the emphasis is on outreach more than punishment. Pimps and johns, on the other hand, are targets for rigorous prosecution. Read more about Richmond Police Have a New Take on the Oldest Profession—But Is It Legal? »

The Unblinking Eyewitness: Should All Police Start Wearing Body Cameras?

Editors’ note: Minutes after the announcement that a Missouri grand jury would not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson for shooting unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brown, Brown’s family released a statement urging that police be required to wear body cameras to record their interactions. The Obama administration and some law enforcement officials have also endorsed the idea. This article delves into the potential pros and cons. Read more about The Unblinking Eyewitness: Should All Police Start Wearing Body Cameras? »

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