Goldman School of Public Policy

Back in Bleak: Nearly Half of U.S. Jobs Are Likely to Vanish in 20 Years. Then What?

Ever get that feeling that you’re slowly sinking into a financial morass, a fiscal tar pit from which you’ll never emerge, no matter how or what you try? That the odds are so grim that your children and their children will end up in even worse shape than you? That the middle class is indeed moribund if not dead, that the rich are getting richer and the poor (including you) are getting poorer, and that the trend will only accelerate until you’re eking by on the dole—if there were a dole, that is. This isn’t the United Kingdom, after all.

Study Says to Improve Schools, Spend More—Why This Challenges Conventional Wisdom

All American children are guaranteed a free public education, but nobody pretends that education is “equal.” The quality of public schools varies widely, and education experts have struggled for decades to correct the inequities—seemingly with little success. But a recently released study suggests that the solution could be surprisingly straightforward.

The Forlorn Off-Year Election: Who Really Benefits from Low Voter Turnout?

Off-cycle elections—such as the one we mostly didn’t vote in on Tuesday—are the steamed peas of the American political process. They are tolerated, but they draw minimal interest, attracting far fewer voters than quadrennial presidential elections and biennial congressional races.

Welcome to the Decentralized Energy Revolution: Cleanly Electrifying the World

While the boons of electricity are obvious to anyone who has watched a 49ers game on a 70-inch ultra HDTV or whipped up a frozen margarita in a blender, it also has its downsides—most of them environmental. Coal and natural gas power plants belch planet-warming CO2 into the atmosphere, while nuclear plants produce highly lethal radwaste.

Policing the Police: New Demands to Reform the Rules for Secret Grand Juries

The toxic aftereffects of the killing of unarmed 18 year old by a Ferguson, Missouri police officer have not only persisted but, if anything, intensified in the wake of similar disturbing cases. Taken together, they have fueled the perception that cops too often shoot young men of color in haste, and with insufficient cause. Simmering distrust of the police has led to protest, rage, and at the extreme end, violent retaliation: two New York City cops were shot to death sitting in their car.

Burdens of “Bias”: Why the Ferguson Outcome Was No Surprise to UC Berkeley Expert

Many of the protestors who had gathered on Ferguson, Missouri’s streets last night correctly predicted that a St. Louis County grand jury would not indict Officer Darren Wilson on criminal charges in the shooting death of African-American teenager Michael Brown. So, too, did UC Berkeley social psychologist Jack Glaser, an associate professor at the Goldman School of Public Policy, who felt the decision was “not even close.”

Why Ferguson is Felt Far and Wide: Hits National Nerves about Racism and Robocops

The police shooting of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, is the lead story on all broadcast, social media and print outlets, pushing out the Gaza conflict, ISIS in Iraq, and the war in Ukraine. It’s caused unease across the country and along the full range of the political spectrum. That’s because it’s not just about a single cop shooting a single teenager. It’s about two trends affecting the United States from coast to coast.

Typhoon Torment: They’re likely to grow stronger, devastating communities for years

Typhoon Haiyan was not an anomaly. Researchers confirm that we should expect more such tropical “super storms” as the planet warms inexorably from human activity. And the grim fact is that a good percentage of these massive cyclones will slam into the Philippines. 

“The Philippines is situated in a unique—and unfortunate—spot on the planet,” says Solomon Hsiang, an assistant professor at UC Berkeley’s Goldman School of Public Policy.

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