Jack Citrin

Mattering, at Last: How Californians Will Determine If the GOP Is Truly Trumped

Some political analysts are showing laudable restraint by deeming the current election year anomalous, or unprecedented, but many are just saying the hell with it, and calling it as they see it—crazy. Or deeply, savagely weird, as Hunter S. Thompson might have characterized it. (And if ever there were an election cycle that needed the late gonzo journalist’s deft touch, it’s the current one.) That weirdness is all-pervading, of course, but its clearest manifestation is the insurgent candidacies of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. Read more about Mattering, at Last: How Californians Will Determine If the GOP Is Truly Trumped »

Angels, Protesters and Patriots: What a Long-Ago Skirmish Says About Love of Country

Lately, I’ve been thinking about an incident that happened in 1965, seven years before I was born. It centered on an antiwar protest in Berkeley, one of the first of countless such protests to come. Though just a blip in the grand scheme of Vietnam era turmoil, it seems to point to something important about America and the nature of patriotism.

It starts with a guy named “Tiny.” Tiny was 6’7” and 300 pounds. And he really liked to fight. Read more about Angels, Protesters and Patriots: What a Long-Ago Skirmish Says About Love of Country »

From the Spring 2016 War Stories issue of California.

California Dreaming

Immigration reform is a complex topic, so it can be quite difficult to quantify public opinion on the subject. But in early May the Institute of Governmental Studies conducted an online poll to do just that. The survey, answered by 3,100 registered California voters, began with a simple choice between the status quo and a pathway to citizenship for all immigrants. Each answer led to more nuanced options in order to understand the specific priorities and opinions of California voters. Read more about California Dreaming »

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