Janet Napolitano

Keepin’ It Real with President Napolitano: The State of the State’s University

Janet Napolitano and I met in her office in downtown Oakland on the afternoon of November 4, 2016, just four days before Hillary Rodham Clinton was thwarted in her attempt to make history by becoming the first woman president of the United States of America.

Some people thought that Napolitano, a former governor of Arizona and Secretary of Homeland Security in the first Obama administration, might herself have been a candidate for the White House. Instead, she became the first woman president of the University of California in 2013. Read more about Keepin' It Real with President Napolitano: The State of the State's University »

From the Winter 2016 Reality Bites issue of California.

How the University of California is Playing a Unique Role in Global Race Against Warming

The Golden Bear has taken on a distinct greenish tinge this week. First there was the announcement at the United Nations Climate Change Conference outside Paris that the University of California is the sole university participant in Bill Gates’ Breakthrough Energy Coalition, a conglomerate of investors dedicated to developing low-carbon energy sources. UC will dedicate $1.25 billion to the venture over the next five years. Read more about How the University of California is Playing a Unique Role in Global Race Against Warming »

After Star Prof Resigns, UC President Calls for Rethinking Sexual Harassment Policies

In the wake of astronomy professor Geoff Marcy’s resignation—after a campus finding that he had been sexually harassing female students for years—University of California President Janet Napolitano says there’s an “urgent need to review University policies that may have inadvertently made the investigation and resolution of this case more difficult.” Read more about After Star Prof Resigns, UC President Calls for Rethinking Sexual Harassment Policies »

On the Money: Which Bill Is Fitting for a Woman? And Which Woman Fits the Bill Best?

Your Facebook feed has probably already told you this, but the public response to U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew’s decision to feature a woman on a redesigned $10 bill has been overwhelming—he says the Treasury has received nearly a million and a half comments and tweets about it. Not everyone is happy, particularly those who campaigned to get a woman on the more popular $20, and are still fighting to change his mind. Read more about On the Money: Which Bill Is Fitting for a Woman? And Which Woman Fits the Bill Best? »

A Year In, the University of California’s Global Food Initiative Sows Success and a Few Fears

In March of last year, Alice Waters, the food activist and owner of the Chez Panisse restaurant, surprised everyone by prematurely announcing the University of California’s plans for a major, sweeping initiative to take on the many problems in the food system—not just on campuses but around the globe. Read more about A Year In, the University of California's Global Food Initiative Sows Success and a Few Fears »

Back in the Game: Cal Program Helps Former Student-Athletes Graduate

When Keala Keanaaina came to Cal on a football scholarship in 1998, a career in the NFL was not on his radar.

“I wasn’t one of those football guys that dreamed of going to the pros,” says Keanaaina. “I chose Berkeley because of its academic reputation. My goal was to graduate and get my degree.”  Read more about Back in the Game: Cal Program Helps Former Student-Athletes Graduate »

From the Spring 2015 Dropouts and Drop-ins issue of California.

Political Payoffs: With Software and Sweat, MapLight Connects Campaign Money to Votes

It’s hardly news that money has a corrosive effect on the political process. Well, maybe it’s news of the dog-bites-man variety: Your jaw isn’t likely to drop to your clavicle in shock, total shock, when you hear that Senator So-and-So voted to deregulate the highly-polluting widget industry shortly after receiving a hefty campaign contribution from Widget Amalgamated. Read more about Political Payoffs: With Software and Sweat, MapLight Connects Campaign Money to Votes »

The Politics of Consent: At UC Campuses, Why ‘No Means No’ Was No Longer Enough

In September, Governor Jerry Brown signed into law the Yes Means Yes rule, the first law in the nation to require California colleges to adopt an affirmative consent standard in sexual assault cases. The legislation is controversial, but advocates see it as an acknowledgment that a “rape culture” is prevalent on university campuses, and politicians and campus administrators need to address that. Read more about The Politics of Consent: At UC Campuses, Why 'No Means No' Was No Longer Enough »

From the Winter 2014 Gender Assumptions issue of California.

Economic Leverage: UC Students Fought Tooth and Nail to Divest from South Africa

When Nelson Mandela died last December, it seemed that the whole world mourned his passing. Twitter overflowed with love for the former South African president. South Africans of all colors and ages sat vigil outside his Johannesburg home. Leaders from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe traveled to FNB Stadium to memorialize Africa’s secular saint, and Barack Obama told the assembled dignitaries, “Nelson Mandela reminds us that it always seems impossible until it is done.” Read more about Economic Leverage: UC Students Fought Tooth and Nail to Divest from South Africa »

From the Fall 2014 Radicals issue of California.

Not Holding Their Tongues: Can the Commencement Speech Be Saved?

When a band of student protesters booed and heckled UC President Janet Napolitano at Laney College over the weekend—to the point where graduates could barely hear her—she became but the latest in a series of invited speakers who’ve suddenly found themselves in the thick of guerilla war over commencement addresses. Read more about Not Holding Their Tongues: Can the Commencement Speech Be Saved? »

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