Archive

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    Power means many things, depending on the context: there’s power as raw energy, power in terms of physical strength, power as money and influence, etc. In this issue, we look at power in all those ways and more. We ask whether power necessarily corrupts, we take a hard look at how hydraulic fracturing has changed the future of energy, and we ask Berkeley experts about the power of everything from hate speech to CRISPR, the revolutionary new gene-editing technology. Also in this issue: Berkeley’s newest Nobel Laureate.

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    The word ‘bug’ first meant something like monster. Think bugbear, bugaboo, bogeyman. Of course, the word has many more meanings now. ‘Bug’ can refer to insects (although, technically speaking only some insects are bugs), viruses (both biological and technological), and eavesdropping devices. To be bugged is to be annoyed but also, potentially, to be spied upon. In the Bugged edition of the magazine, we delve into all these meanings. Features include a tour of Berkeley’s Essig Museum of Entomology, a story on the deadly flu pandemic of 1918, and even a piece about the Cal engineer who authored a famous repair manual for VW Beetles, a.k.a. Bugs.

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    Homo sapiens dates back more than 100,000 years, but civilization only takes root after the end of the last ice age, roughly 10,000 years ago. Today, with more than 7.5 billion of us the planet is changing due to our collective influence. Along with the marvels of modernity have come global warming and widespread species extinction. In this issue, we examine how we will (or won’t) adapt to the emergent geologic epoch, the Anthropocene.

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    Can we be taught, or nudged, to do the right thing? Is it ever ethical for journalists to engage in deception? Are drugs medicines or poisons, or both? These are some of the questions we explore in this issue on vice and virtue (or vice versa). Articles include a piece on photographer Charles Gatewood, whose papers were acquired by the Bancroft Library, a look at Berkeley’s unparalleled involvement in the Peace Corps, and a reflection on life in the Berkeley co-ops.

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    UC Berkeley was named for the Anglo-Irish philosopher George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne, who argued that all material reality is mind-dependent. To be, the Right Reverend insisted, is to be perceived. In this issue we examine the theme of reality with stories on the plight of America’s wrongly convicted, the current reality of climate change (and what we can still do about it), and George Berkeley’s philosophical idealism. That, plus a Q&A with UC President Janet Napolitano and a profile of Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Viet Thanh Nguyen.

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    As Election Day approaches, the political circus dominates the news and Americans everywhere are wondering how we came to this: Two roundly disliked candidates—one a consummate Washington operative/insider, the other a celebrity wheeler-dealer who has never held elected office. Will we end up with the first woman president in America’s history (and an ex-president as our first-ever First Gentleman?) or just the first reality tv star to be commander in chief? In an attempt to make sense it all, California looks at some of the stories behind this election cycle, including: the increasing influence of social media in politics; the ways in which coded language gets used in political discourse; and how the decline of the white middle class gave rise to the current wave of populism. All that and more, plus a piece on the crusading work of Randy Schekman, Nobel-winning biologist.

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    If it was the same over there as it is right here, there would hardly be any point in going anywhere. But thankfully our planet is endlessly varied, and, even now, in our increasingly homogenized world, travel remains one of life’s greatest and most rewarding pleasures. In the 2016 Summer Travel issue of California, we take you along with us on various journeys, from a band tour through West Africa to a slightly angst-ridden vacation in Greece. We also visit a water project in Kenya’s largest slum, examine the secret lives of Russians, and go cruising through Patagonia with Cal Discoveries. We hope you’ll come along and, who knows, perhaps even be inspired to share you our own tales of being elsewhere. Enjoy!

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    It’s a good thing war is so terrible, Robert E. Lee once said, “otherwise we should grow too fond of it.” In this issue, we present stories of war that are both great and terrible, including the story of the Berkeley economist who died on the battlefields of Spain, Cold War tales of espionage and war averted, and a story about protest and patriotism that examines what it means to love one’s country. We also hear from Cal veterans as well as survivors and refugees from conflict. All that, plus: CAA Alumnus of the Year James Simons, “world’s smartest billionaire.”

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    In the era of BuzzFeed and Twitter feeds and Snapchat, what does it mean to report the news? How has the rapid rise of social media changed journalism as both practice and profession? In this issue California looks at the state of the Fourth Estate and examines various new media developments from the rise and fall of hyperlocal news sites to the growing popularity of podcasts and the prospects for crowdfunded reporting.

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    Is racial discrimination adaptive or learned behavior? How do the blind perceive race? Should ethnic background be a factor in university admissions? What do we make of racially charged incidents on and around the Berkeley campus? And what does the new Latino plurality in the state mean for the future of California? Lots of questions, and few answers, on the thorniest of topics.

  • In this issue, the magazine looks at some of the ways in which society is grappling with future of food, crime, spaceflight, transportation, and medicine. Plus, we revisit the cryonics movement and the story of James Bedford—Cal alum and the first man ever to be cryonically preserved.
  • It’s safe to say most alumni magazines ignore their drop-outs. But, let’s face it, Berkeley is different. And that uniqueness is a big part of what draws people here—both to the University and to the scene that has grown up around it. In this issue we look at both tribes—the “drop-ins” and dropouts.
  • The UC Berkeley admissions application offers aspiring students two gender designations to choose from. Check a box: M or F? Meanwhile, Facebook offers users 58 choices to pick from, including androgyne, intersex, transmasculine, and two-spirit. Come along as we explore this brave new world.
  • Like it or not, no university in America is as closely associated with the word “radical” as UC Berkeley. But what does the term actually mean? On the 50th anniversary of the Free Speech Movement, California examines the question with a reflection on the campus’s radical legacy.
  • Some say the world will end in fire, some say in ice, but in California magazine’s Apocalypse Issue, the scenarios range from asteroid collisions to galloping plagues, massive earthquakes to century-long droughts.
  • Meet the Berkeley icon who wrote the book on branding, visit a socialist topical paradise in search of a new identity, and take a hard look at how humans slur one another. Also a dishy dissertation on Chez Panisse; mind-blowing cat-and-mouse research; and a saga of love, war and Cal football.
  • How our digital universe exploded. Plus: Would Twain have tweeted? Does the library have a future? Will online courses ‘disrupt’ higher education? And more.
  • Featuring political economist (and film star) Robert Reich, Focus Features CEO James Schamus, documentary filmmaker Jesse Moss, the Pacific Film Archive, and more.
  • Berkeley gets a new chancellor, the Bay gets a new bridge, China goes looking for resources, extra innings for Cal Baseball, etc.
  • Stories of childhood, parenting, and old age with Ursula K. Le Guin, Paula Fass, Kenneth Brower, et al.
  • Four outsiders get grounded at Cal; Putin punked in gay Russia; a second generation scrapbook; and the truth behind Argo.
  • Brown’s Do-Over, California by the Numbers, One Nation Under God, Body Politics, Re-Play, Campus Spies, Your Vote Counts, and many more.
  • North/South Cultural One-Upmanship, The Upside of Attachment Theory, Downsizing California, The Downside of Vacationing in Guatemala, Berkeley 1912, Prison Reform, Cal Olympic Glory, and many more.
  • Alumnus of the Year Eric Schmidt, Computers Under Siege, Guarding the World’s Seas, Reich Sees the Problem, Turning Patents into C Notes, T Cells Fight the Big C, Warren Hellman Remembered, Venice Backstreets, Ginger Beer Plant, and many more.
  • The Return of Moden, Computer Connoisseur, Cowabunga, Something Old, Something New, The Language of Wine, Bus Stop and Start, Early Days of Chez Panisse, Tax the Rich?, Industrial Arts, Mayan Time, and many more.
  • Snaps of a Civil War, Your Body’s Battles, Israeli-Palestine Campus Clash, The Ecology of Conflict, China’s Greatest Admiral, Adventures in Tahrir Square, Joe Kapp v. the NFL, Frederick Wiseman, Nicolle Wallace, Richard Muller, and more.
  • Banker’s Bluegrass, Music Appreciation, This is Radio Kal, Marching Band Blues, Sproul Plaza (Live), The Greek Theatre, Michael Chabon’s Telegraph Ave., Joe Garrett’s True Rock n’ Roll Tales, Wendy Northcutt’s Darwin Awards
  • California Spirituality, Envisioning Faith, Atheism on Campus, What Voters Believe, The Tao of Ed White, and the CAA 2011 Alumnus of the Year, Steven Chu
  • The brain and the body in step, Bugging out at home, In love—until you go out, BAM in transition
  • Addicted to Prop. 13, Psychotropic Research’s Œdipal Complex, Undergraduate Anxiety, Obsessed with Moral Purity
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    Dusting off the works of Eugene Burdick, Beverly Cleary, Ina Coolbrith, Harriet Lane Levy, and George Stewart . Plus: Hyenas in the hills, rebranding public health, advertisers we have known, and more…
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    Truth & Lies, Rube Goldberg’s Last Laugh, Errol Morris and the Truth about Truth, Trevor Paglen Spies on Spies, Berkeley Crime-Stoppers, Moonlighting Blogademics, China’s News Black-Out, Can Cal Afford Athletics?, The Beauty of the Philippines, Richard Goldman named CAA’s Alumnus of the Year
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    Slicing up the pie. One way or another consumers will get their just desserts. Future fuels, super crops, drier wines…
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    Under Construction, A Bigger History, A Campus Crusade, A New J-School Model, When the lefty press was young, Get your news in the Alumni Gazette, The brilliance of babies, Life after football, Diversity and its discontents
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    The naked issue, Confidential, Vaccine for sick reporting, Curtain call for Robert Cole
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    The humor issue, New Mark Twain, New Yorker cartoonist Mike Twohy, Jon Carroll remember The Pelican, The other Last Suppers, Uber-modern hula, Pete Newell, Alan Dundes, and more.
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    Act Globally, 2009 Alumnus of the Year Robert D. Haas ’64
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    In Search of Dark Energy, Dark Matter, and The Theory of Everything, The problems with electronic voting, David Simon’s blues, Mimicking Mother Nature, Funding the Hybrid University, and Life on Mars
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    Designing [Green] California, Sweating in the Arctic, Art from the ashes, Sonoma’s radical experiment, California’s Central Park, Eco-neighborhoods, The world’s greenest building, Safer chemicals and slower foods
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    Gold rush, Cal Olympic hopefuls, Why gamblers really lose it, Funny, you don’t look Jewish, gridiron dancers, rugby wolves, and building the better body.
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    China games, The world’s largest nation races against the West—and itself
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    Meet your new brain, Sophisticated new tools are forcing us to rethink thinking, A Hangover Cure from Mars, Crazy or Just Sleepy?, John Searle on why artificial intelligence flunks out, Hubert Dreyfus on why Second Life is no life at all, Beyond DNA: What the genome can’t explain
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    25 brilliant California ideas, eureka!, The Worst Insult?, How To Get A Raise, Alumnus of the Year: Hon. Thelton E. Henderson, The unflappable Garrison Keillor Berkeley’s Hewlett Rocky & Bullwinkle’s dad, What’s in store, from e-clothes to cancer-eating germs
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    But is it art?, Architect Toyo Ito’s new Berkeley Art Museum defies all boundaries—virtual and real, public and private, Pity The Macho Man, A Better Forest Fire, A special report on new media, Marianne Weems’s digital world theater, Mexico’s racial legacy, Serbia’s secrets, Iran’s loss, and Shanghai’s golden years, In Sather Gate: The Play meets the Free Speech Movement
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    U Start-up, Berkeley’s energy venture will radically reshape the university, the Bay Area, and the world, Online Bank Fraud, The Next Freeway Collapse?, Can Ed Blakely revive New Orleans? Flying ants, Twyla Tharp, and Teri McKeever, the unconvential winner
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    is love still in the air?, New hippies and old dig the 40th anniversary of the Summer of Love By Ben Fong-Torres, California Abroad, Pico Lyer: The Cuban’s miracle, Cynthia Gorney: A Chiapas reunion, Sarah Pollock: Wintering in Norway, Laurie Becklund: Romancing Chile, Why Teens Lie, Women, Men, & Carbs, Plus: Beautiful, nervous New Zealand, School’s out!, Berkeley teachers, students in the wind, & Why Tibetans aren’t a bumper sticker
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    Is Alice right?, From Chez Panisse, she transformed the way we eat. Now Alice Waters wants to revolutionize the way we teach out kids., Plus Andrew Lam on crossroads cuisine, Rick Wartzman on New Ruralism, Michael Pollan on the Farm Bill, Eric Gower on breaking culinary rules, and photographer Reagan Louie returns to his California roots and in Sather Gate Berkeley’s academic family tree
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    Featuring 100s of Berkeley Luminaries: Don Fisher, Natalie Coughlin, Scott Adams, Steven Chu, Ronald Dellums, Joan Didion, John Doar, Rupert Garcia, Robert Hass, Maxine Hong Kingston, Barbara Lee, Robert McNamara, Greil Marcus, Norman Mineta, Gregory Peck, James Schamus, Earl Warren, and more…
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    25 brilliant California ideas selected by the faculties of UCLA and UC Berkeley. Plus, is there new hope for American health care?
  • Will warrantless searches and the power to torture survive beyond this presidency? The man who wrote the memos insists they must.
  • Are you in danger from global warming? A map of California’s future.
  • 500 years after Columbus thought he’d discovered India, we are truly found.
  • Berkeley scientists find warning signs of massive and disturbing changes to the park.
  • Search engines are racing to put everything knowable online, and crack the secrets of artificial intelligence.
  • Our histories are interwoven. Business and cultural trade are exploding. So why is our future so tense?