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Human Behavior

Tetons are Awe-ful (Dexter Hake)

Awe is the Secret Ingredient to a Good Life

By Laura Smith

What Dacher Keltner teaches isn’t likely to land you a job on Wall Street or even make you more hireable, but that’s not really the point.

Credit at bottom of page

The Edge Episode 21: Abolish Race (in Medicine)!

For centuries, doctors have medically treated people differently according to their race because they believed that race is biological. But in the last few years, medical professionals and activists have argued that this is both wrongheaded and can be dangerous to people’s health. In this episode, we talk to Stephen Richmond, a primary care physician and assistant professor at Stanford about the movement to abolish race from medicine and how race and biology do and do not intersect. 

Clark Kerr [l], former President of the University of California, leaves a meeting of the Board of Regents after they fired him at Governor Ronald Reagan's insistence. (Ted Streshinsky/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

The Winter Issue’s Editor’s Note

By Pat Joseph

“The University is not engaged in making ideas safe for students. It is engaged in making students safe for ideas.”

iStock.com/peopleimages

Tackling the Teen Sleep Crisis

By Laura Smith

Five questions with Lisa L. Lewis '89, Author of The Sleep-Deprived Teen

Base art iStock

Think your ideas are your own? Think again.

By Meher Bhatia

While most of us like to think we come by our beliefs independently, new research out of Berkeley suggests otherwise.  

Illustration by Stephanie Singleton

“I am a minimally speaking autistic person who was not expected to go to college.” Now he’s getting his PhD

By Hari Srinivasan ’22 as told to Laura Smith

I was not expected to go to college. 

An Orchestra Conductor, Covid Vaccinations Without the Poke, and a Roma Activist

By Martin Snapp

Although he’s still in his twenties, Stefano Flavoni ’15 is already making his mark on the classical music scene.

gotpap/STAR MAX/IPx

Don’t Bother Trying to Debate Politics with That Uncle this Thanksgiving

By Maia Nehme

A new study by a Berkeley political scientist challenges the long-held assumption that bipartisan interactions inevitably decrease divisions between voters.

Courtesy of the Science History Institute

The Man Who Loved DDT

By Elena Conis

Berkeley biochemist Tom Jukes was an ardent conservationist and life member of the Sierra Club, but he just didn’t get 1960s environmentalism. The thing that bugged him most about the movement was its “emotional binge” against the pesticide DDT.

Photo by Dexter Hake

Into the Ishi Wilderness

By Laura Smith

To get to the Ishi Wilderness you’ll want a full tank of gas and four-wheel-drive. Even then, you should be willing to ditch the car and walk. The approximately 41,000-acre wilderness area is located in the Lassen National Forest in a remote part of the southern Cascade foothills northeast of Chico, within sight of Mount Lassen.

(iStock.com/Mukul Shilpa Gupta)

Animals Drink Alcohol Too

By Margie Cullen

Humans have many things in common with monkeys: large brains, hands that can grasp objects, complex social groups. A new study published in the journal Royal Society Open Science confirms another commonality: a taste for alcohol.

(NISARGMEDIA/Alamy Stock Photo)

Beware Second Hand Bong Smoke

By Krissy Waite

Most people today recognize the health risks of inhaling tobacco smoke, even secondhand. Fewer are aware of the dangers of cannabis smoke.