Arthur Reingold

Q&A: The Truth About the Flu

The annual flu season is in full career across most of the country and parts of California have been particularly hard hit. We reached out to Arthur Reingold, head of epidemiology at UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health, for some answers about the nature of the influenza virus, what we can do to control it, and  the risk of another flu pandemic like the one of 1918.

In Flew Enza: Remembering the Plague Year in Berkeley

In 1918, America was at war and students arriving at the University of California in the fall of that year found their campus transformed. From the Center Street entrance, the view of the hills was now obscured by large new barracks and the dark smoke issuing from the powerhouse gave the place the look of a factory. Everywhere young men wore the khaki uniforms of the various military outfits represented on campus—the Student Army Training Center, the School of Military Aeronautics, the Naval Unit, and the Ambulance Corps.

From the Fall 2017 Bugged issue of California.

Kill the Suckers: Would a Mosquito Apocalypse Be a Catastrophe or a Godsend?

When I was growing up in Queens, NY, mosquitoes tortured us all through the muggy summers. I ran around with pink splotches of calamine lotion covering my arms and legs. The cold of the lotion soothed the itch for about seven seconds. Never stopped me from scratching. We hated mosquitoes. We wanted them to disappear—not just from Queens, but from the face of the earth.

Ebola and the Endgame: Whatever the Next Plague, It’s Not a Question of If, But When

Editors’ Note: This summer has seen the most widespread, deadly outbreak of Ebola in recorded history as the virus has ravaged West Africa. This week we learned that a U.S. doctor and missionary who contracted Ebola while working there and were flown to Atlanta’s Emory University Hospital have been successfully treated and released. Medical experts have downplayed concerns about an Ebola epidemic striking here, given that the disease doesn’t spread easily from person-to-person and the U.S. health care system is better equipped to track, isolate and treat the infected.

Reality Injection: Why California’s Whooping Cough Epidemic is Only Getting Worse

Pertussis continues to spread in California, with 3,458 cases reported between January 1 and June 10: In less than half a year, the toll of the sickened already has exceeded all reported cases for 2013. State health officials have now declared a pertussis epidemic—deeply worrisome, considering the bacterium* poses a particularly dire threat to infants. 

Back with a Vengeance: Berkeley’s Head Epidemiologist On the Return of Pertussis

Professor Arthur Reingold is Head of Epidemiology at UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health

California: Is whooping cough coming back?

We certainly are having a resurgence of pertussis in the United States, although it’s never gone away. It is a threat to very young infants, particularly those too young to be vaccinated or who have not yet had a complete series of the vaccines. 

Where does pertussis come from? How can you catch it?

From the Summer 2014 Apocalypse issue of California.

Hold the Chicken Little

The news came out of China this week that a strain of bird flu known as H7N9 has broken into the human population. It’s infected 82 people, of whom 17 have died — a mortality rate of 21 percent — and is suspected of human-to-human transmission.

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